The Family Album
directed by Alan Berliner


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QT4

Film/Video
LOST IMAGES REGAINED
FILMS BY ALAN BERLINER


WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 10, 2001,
7 PM

$6 ($3 WALKER MEMBERS)
AUDITORIUM
$

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LOST IMAGES REGAINED
JANUARY: 10 13 17 19


INTRODUCED BY THE FILMMAKER
New York-based filmmaker-installation artist Alan Berliner teaches at the New School for Social Research in New York City. He has received five Emmy nominations and two Emmy Awards for his work. Berliner will participate in the Lost Images Filmmakers' Dialogue on January 13 and will be an artist-in-residence at the Walker this year.

CITY EDITION
The subject of this early film is the process by which we create news, produce it, and eventually toss it away. Using archival films of newspaper production, war footage, and events both local and global, Berliner ties the various stages of the news process together like the twine around a bundle of papers. City Edition is a superbly edited and scored film that imitates, critiques, and reuses the newsreels of cinema's past. 1980, U.S., 10 minutes.

EVERYWHERE AT ONCE
The Grand Prize winner of the 1985 Ann Arbor Film Festival, Everywhere at Once whirls found footage of various types of movement into a 10-minute tour de force. Like City Edition, it is impossible to ignore the brilliant editing, but where that film draws parallels to newsreels, Everywhere at Once seems to take much of its inspiration from the cartoon shorts of the '50s and '60s. 1985, U.S., 10 minutes.

THE FAMILY ALBUM
Berliner's first long-form experimental documentary, The Family Album constructs a story of the evolution of the most basic of social groups assembled from the anonymous footage of 75 families. Using found audio tapes in conjunction with the discovered visuals, he symbolically and literally melds them into one. Berliner brings "dramatically alive the intense agony and ambivalence and love within families. His dazzling technical mastery of the relation between sound and image is always kept in the service of deep psychological truths" (Film Comment). The Family Album was included in the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1987 biennial exhibition. 1986, U.S., 60 minutes.