OCTOBER 12, 2000-APRIL 8, 2001
ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE: BILL T. JONES
Exhibition
THE ANDERSEN WINDOW GALLERY



   
One of the most inspiring artists of our time, Bill T. Jones envisions dance that "acts as a microcosm of society." The foundation of his practice, evident in a remarkable range of works created during the past 20 years, encompasses investigations rooted in the purity of movement as well as overtly political works that search for truths about contemporary life. His interest in crafting a synthesis of formal concerns and social relevance has led him to pursue choreographic means ranging from personally driven, internalized examinations to works produced as artist-in-residence that draw on the external participation of local communities.

 

Image
Bill T. Jones
photo: Joanne Savio

The exhibition Artist-in-Residence: Bill T. Jones shows the development of this artistic process by focusing on the beginning stages of a project. Loud Boy, a new dance-theater work, explores classical themes of spirituality raised in Euripides' The Bacchae that still resonate today. Jones began his research last spring in Minneapolis and San Francisco with a series of workshops that ask the question "What does your God look like?" in order to uncover deeply rooted personal and cultural images of God. The installation incorporates imagery and text from The Bacchae selected by the artist to create an environment in which to contemplate these representations of God, and will include an interactive component allowing gallery visitors to participate in Jones' continued research on this project.

The Walker Art Center has an extensive commissioning and presenting history with the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, most recently through a long-term residency project begun in 1997. Over the past four years, Jones and company members have visited the Twin Cities numerous times to perform and to participate in various community activities, including forums, workshops, lecture-demonstrations, master classes, and post-performance discussions.

Your "window on the world," the uniquely designed Andersen Window Gallery features a media bar with an interactive wall of educational resources such as computer stations, videos, and selected publications. To see previous installations, visit the Andersen Window Gallery Web site. This multipurpose gallery is available for use as a site for meetings or programs. For more information, call 612.375.7610.




THE ANDERSEN WINDOW GALLERY IS MADE POSSIBLE BY GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM ANDERSEN CORPORATION. ADDITIONAL SUPPORT IS PROVIDED BY THE PEW CHARITABLE TRUSTS AND THE BETLACH FAMILY FOUNDATION. THIS GALLERY WAS DESIGNED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH BLU DOT DESIGN OF MINNEAPOLIS.


RELATED EVENTS

BILL T. JONES IN RESIDENCE
FEBRUARY 26-MARCH 10, 2001
The concluding months of choreographer Bill T. Jones' four-year residency with the Walker includes a range of master classes, lecture-demonstrations, artist dialogues, school workshops, and open company classes.


TALKING DANCE: A CONVERSATION WITH BILL T. JONES
THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 2001, 8 PM, FREE
Bill T. Jones reflects on his work in the Twin Cities, discusses his latest pieces, and looks at what lies ahead for himself and his company.


FREE FIRST SATURDAY
THE TABLE PROJECT
SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 2001, 11:30 AM, 1 AND 2:30 PM, FREE
This new work, commissioned by the Walker and set to a Schubert string trio played live, features a specially designed table upon and around which Twin Cities residents, choreographed and rehearsed by Jones, will "perform."


BEGINNERS' MOVEMENT WORKSHOP
MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2001, 6-8 PM, $8 ($4 WALKER MEMBERS)
Explore the world of modern movement with Bill T. Jones and company members in an informative and inspiring "all shapes, all sizes" dance workshop. Limited to 30 participants. For tickets, call the Walker box office at 612.375.7622.


PERFORMANCE
YOU WALK?
SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2001, 8 PM, $29.50 ($24 WALKER MEMBERS)
The three-part evening-length work, which audiences had the opportunity to see in development during Bill T. Jones' residency at the Walker in April 2000, embraces metaphorical notions of travel with the freest possible movement and visual language.