Walker Art Center

35° FCloudyVia weather.com

AVANT MUSEOLOGY

Jonathas de Andrade, Adrienne Edwards, Boris Groys, Wayne Koestenbaum,
Ane Hjort Guttu, Nisa Mackie,
Fionn Meade, Sohrab Mohebbi,
Timothy Morton, Elizabeth Povinelli,
Walid Raad, Hito Steyerl, Anton Vidokle,
Cary Wolfe, Arseny Zhilyaev

Hito Steyerl, Factory of the Sun, 2015Jonathas de Andrade, Posters for the museum of the northeast man, 2013Rosemarie Trockel, AS FAR AS POSSIBLE, 2012

AVANT MUSEOLOGY

Jonathas de Andrade, Adrienne Edwards, Boris Groys, Wayne Koestenbaum,
Ane Hjort Guttu, Nisa Mackie,
Fionn Meade, Sohrab Mohebbi,
Timothy Morton, Elizabeth Povinelli,
Walid Raad, Hito Steyerl, Anton Vidokle,
Cary Wolfe, Arseny Zhilyaev

A two-day symposium exploring the practices and sociopolitical implications of contemporary museology

Resources

Dialogue / Interview

Avant Museology: Jonathas de Andrade and Adrienne Edwards

Jonathas de Andrade and Adrienne Edwards discuss the ways his bodies of work interrogate social, economic, and political systems, often through fugitive acts that rely on and articulate the… More

Lecture

Avant Museology: Hito Steyerl

A Tank on a Pedestal: Museums in an Age of Planetary Civil War A tank on a pedestal. Fumes are rising from the engine. A Soviet battle tank— called IS–3 for Joseph Stalin—is being repurposed by a group of pro–Russian separatists… More

Lecture

Avant Museology: Anton Vidokle

Anton Vidokle will present part of a new film based on Russian Cosmist philosopher Nikolai Fedorov’s 1880 essay “The Museum, Its Meaning and Mission,” included in Avant–Garde Museology. Starring members of the present–day Fedorov… More


Lecture

Avant Museology: Sohrab Mohebbi

Sohrab Mohebbi’s presentation explores the possibilities of theory as an art form. Proposing a quasi–history, it investigates how artists, and by extension art spaces, contribute to theoretical debates. Drawing upon a number of… More

Lecture

Avant Museology: Ane Hjort Guttu and Nisa Mackie

It is an open question as to whether the museum provides the best context for artistic expression, social analysis, and political change. If the prevailing aim is to subvert an existing socioeconomic order, in the “BIG” museum there… More

Lecture

Avant Museology: Elizabeth Povinelli

Filmmaking as Perpetual Motion Museum In 2012, under the auspices of the Karrabing Film Collective, Elizabeth Povinelli and her Indigenous colleagues began making short films as a method of self– organization, social analysis, and… More


Dialogue / Interview

Avant Museology: Cary Wolfe and Timothy Morton

In this freewheeling conversation, Timothy Morton and Cary Wolfe will explore the idea of the “avant” and the various ways in which “avantness” has historically been incarnated in art, literature, music, and culture. Both authors will… More

Lecture

Avant Museology: Arseny Zhilyaev

The editor of Avant–Garde Museology reflects upon the main conclusions drawn from his research for the book. Today many contemporary artists uphold the historical avant-garde’s negative attitude toward the museum as an… More

Lecture

Avant Museology: Boris Groys

The Art Museum and Its Discontents There is a long history of discontent regarding art museums. And this discontent could be related to the main promise of the museum: to protect artworks. In response to this promise, people… More


Avant Museology is a two-day symposium copresented by the Walker Art Center, e-flux, and the University of Minnesota Press.

Taking its cue from the recently published book Avant-Garde Museology, the symposium will address the memory machine of the contemporary museum vis-à-vis its relationship to the contemporary artistic practices, sociopolitical contexts, and theoretical legacies that shape and animate it. Where the museum may have once been a mere container for objects and ephemera, the mutability of the contemporary museum has facilitated the apparently seamless absorption of its own complex histories, paradoxical politics, and socioeconomic functions and ideas. It begs the question: can contemporary museology be invested with the energy of the visionary and political projects contained in the works that it circulates and remembers?

The museum of contemporary art might very well be the most advanced recording device ever invented in the history of humankind. It is a place for the storage of historical grievances and the memory of forgotten artistic experiments, social projects, or errant futures. But in late 19th- and early 20th-century Russia, this recording device was undertaken by a number of artists and thinkers as a site for experimentation. Edited by Arseny Zhilyaev, Avant-Garde Museology documents the progressivism of the period, with texts by Alexander Bogdanov, Nikolai Fedorov, Kazimir Malevich, Andrey Platonov, Aleksandr Rodchenko, and many others—several of which are translated into English for the first time. At the center of much of this thought and production is a shared belief in the capacity of art, museums, and public exhibitions to produce an entirely new subject: a better, more evolved human being. And yet, though the early decades of 20th-century Russia have been firmly registered in today’s art history as a time of radical social and artistic change, the uncompromising and often absurd ideas in Avant-Garde Museology appear alien to a contemporary art history that explains suprematism and constructivism in terms of formal abstraction. In fact, these works were part of a far larger project to absolutely instrumentalize art and its rational capacities and apply its forms and spaces to a project of uncompromising progressivism—a total transformation of life by all possible means, whether by designing architecture for life in outer space, developing artistic technology for the resurrection of the dead, or evolving new sensory organs for our bodies.

Today, it is hard to deny the similarity between the bourgeois museum and the contemporary liberal dogmas of open-ended contemplation and abstract self-realization that guide curatorial and museum culture since the dismantling of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. As such, this symposium will launch a further investigation into the militant inclusiveness and delirious pragmatism of the early avant-gardes, shedding light on the social and artistic decisions of a critical period of left-wing politics as well as the ideology of contemporary museological culture more broadly. An explicit question suddenly emerges: under a regime in which social experiments and upheavals become abstract formal gestures, what has the political application of historical memory become?

Perhaps the museum of contemporary art already serves this purpose. Consider what Nikolai Fedorov wrote in 1880s: that the ultimate function of the museum is to unify progressives and conservatives, vitality and death: "And our age in no way dares to imagine that progress itself would ever become the achievement of history, and this grave, this museum, becomes the reconstruction of all of progress’s victims at the time when struggle will be supplanted by accord, and unity in the purpose of reconstruction, only in which parties of progressives and conservatives can be reconciled—parties that have been warring since the beginning of history.”

Avant Museology will coincide with the opening of Question the Wall Itself (November 20, 2016–May 21, 2017), an exhibition curated by Walker Art Center Artistic Director Fionn Meade with Jordan Carter, featuring the work of Jonathas de Andrade, Uri Aran, Nina Beier, Marcel Broodthaers, Tom Burr, Alejandro Cesarco, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Theaster Gates, Ull Hohn, Janette Laverrière/Nairy Baghramian, Louise Lawler, Nick Mauss, Park McArthur, Lucy McKenzie, Shahryar Nashat, Walid Raad, Seth Siegelaub, Paul Sietsema, Florine Stettheimer, Rosemarie Trockel, Danh Vo, Cerith Wyn Evans, and Akram Zaatari. Question the Wall Itself runs November 20, 2016–May 21, 2017.

Please contact curatorial assistant Misa Jeffereis for more information: misa.jeffereis@walkerart.org.


Symposium Schedule

Sunday, November 20

12:30 pm

Cinema doors open

1:00 pm

Opening remarks

1:05-1:45 pm

Arseny Zhilyaev

1:45-2:30 pm

Fionn Meade and Walid Raad in conversation

2:30-3:30 pm

Boris Groys

3:30-4:00 pm

Break

4:00-4:45 pm

Jonathas de Andrade and Adrienne Edwards in conversation

4:45-5:30 pm

Hito Steyerl

8:00-10:00 pm

Reception: Lounge Act at the Thek Lounge

Skyline Room, Walker Art Center

Free, entry on a first come, first served basis

Monday, November 21

10:30 am

Cinema doors open

11:00 am

Opening remarks

11:00-11:45 am

Anton Vidokle

11:45-12:30 pm

Sohrab Mohebbi

12:30-1:30 pm

Break

1:45-2:30 pm

Ane Hjort Guttu and Nisa Mackie in conversation

2:30-3:30 pm

Elizabeth Povinelli

3:30-3:45 pm

Break

3:45-4:30 pm

Timothy Morton and Cary Wolfe in conversation

4:30 pm

Closing remarks

Symposium Sessions

Sunday, November 20, 1:00-6:00 pm

Doors open 12:30 pm

1:05 pm | Arseny Zhilyaev

The editor of Avant–Garde Museology reflects upon the main conclusions drawn from his research for the book. Today many contemporary artists uphold the historical avant-garde’s negative attitude toward the museum as an institution for maintaining the class enemy’s order of things. In 1917, with the new social agenda of the Russian Proletarian Revolution, art was transformed from a bourgeois ghetto into a means of production in the service of a new communist society and a new human. Marxist museology appeared to provide a possible solution to the dilemma the historical avant–garde posed to artistic institutions. The display methodology and concept of the post–revolutionary museum drew closer to historical materialist practice, even echoing a number of avant–garde principles. According to Zhilyaev, the final stage in establishing museology as a means of production and a medium for social and human development is best described by the philosophy of Russian Cosmism, which envisioned the museum of art as the ultimate frontier for human expression—based not on social or physical contradictions, but on overcoming any limits imposed by nature or Earthbound political or economic orders.

1:45 pm | Fionn Meade and Walid Raad

Fionn Meade and Walid Raad discuss the artist’s work, which includes The Atlas Group, a 15-year project (1989–2004) about the contemporary history of Lebanon, and the ongoing projects Scratching on Things I Could Disavow and Sweet Talk: Commissions (Beirut). Raad is an artist and a professor of art at Cooper Union, New York.

2:30 pm | Boris Groys

The Art Museum and Its Discontents

There is a long history of discontent regarding art museums. And this discontent could be related to the main promise of the museum: to protect artworks. In response to this promise, people usually think that there is 1.) too much protection for art; and 2.) not enough protection for art. Most often, these two responses become intertwined. Though this may seem paradoxical, the art museum is nonetheless regularly criticized for being simultaneously too protective and not protective enough.

3:30-4:00 pm | BREAK

4:00 pm | Jonathas de Andrade and Adrienne Edwards

Jonathas de Andrade and Adrienne Edwards discuss the ways his bodies of work interrogate social, economic, and political systems, often through fugitive acts that rely on and articulate the fleeting dimensions of memory, history, mythology, and desire. The conversation focuses on Andrade’s multifaceted project Museu do Homem do Nordeste (Museum of the Northeastern Man; 2013 –), realized as private and chance encounters to create photographic portraits that culminate in a dynamic poster installation to a conceptual and material framework for his recent solo museum exhibition at the Museu de Arte do Rio, in which he redeploys notable marketing tactics such as brand development into art objects. Their dialogue delves into the complicated notion of the Brazilian imaginary as espoused by sociologist Gilbreto Freire, who founded the museum in 1979 for which these artworks are named, as well as authored the seminal text Grande e Senzala (The Master and the Slaves), first published in 1933.

4:45 pm | Hito Steyerl

A Tank on a Pedestal: Museums in an Age of Planetary Civil War

A tank on a pedestal. Fumes are rising from the engine. A Soviet battle tank— called IS–3 for Joseph Stalin—is being repurposed by a group of pro–Russian separatists in Konstantinovka, Eastern Ukraine. It is driven off a WWII memorial pedestal and promptly goes to war. According to a local militia, it “attacked a checkpoint in Ulyanovka, Krasnoarmeysk district, resulting in three dead and three wounded on the Ukrainian side, and no losses on our side.”

One might think that the active historical role of a tank would be over once it became part of a historical display. But this pedestal seems to have acted as temporary storage from which the tank could be redeployed directly into battle. Apparently, the way into the museum—or even into history itself—is not a one–way street. Is the museum a garage? An arsenal? Is a monument pedestal actually a military base?

RECEPTION: Lounge Act at the Thek Lounge

Sunday, November 20, 8:00–10:00 pm

Skyline Room, Walker Art Center

*Free, entry on a first come, first served basis

In conjunction with the exhibition Question the Wall Itself, Avant Museology will be followed by a program in the Walker’s Skyline Room: Lounge Act at the Thek Lounge.

Poet, critic, and artist Wayne Koestenbaum performs piano miniatures (Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Chopin, Schumann, Albéniz, Fauré, Antheil, Poulenc, and others) while incanting spontaneous Sprechstimme–style soliloquies. Koestenbaum's words—improvised on the spot for the occasion—will stream in correspondence with the musical phrases in the score. Nietzsche might have called this nervy practice a gay science; at the Thek Lounge, we call it confessional Socratic cabaret, or stand–up–comic séance pianism, with cocktails and other distractions.

Thek Lounge is presented by Bureau des Services sans Spécificité, Geneva, with Adam Linder, Shahryar Nashat, and Sohrab Mohebbi.

Monday, November 21, 11:00 am-5:00 pm

Doors open 10:30 am

11:00 am | Anton Vidokle

Anton Vidokle will present part of a new film based on Russian Cosmist philosopher Nikolai Fedorov’s 1880 essay “The Museum, Its Meaning and Mission,” included in Avant–Garde Museology. Starring members of the present–day Fedorov Library in Moscow as well as Arseny Zhilyaev, the film was shot last winter at the State Tretyakov Gallery, the Moscow Zoological Museum, the Lenin Library, and the Museum of Revolution. Titled Immortality and Resurrection for All, the film is an artistic interpretation of Fedorov’s universal museum, where immortality and resurrection will be actualized.

11:45 pm | Sohrab Mohebbi

Sohrab Mohebbi’s presentation explores the possibilities of theory as an art form. Proposing a quasi–history, it investigates how artists, and by extension art spaces, contribute to theoretical debates. Drawing upon a number of works, the presentation asks not what theory does for art but what art does for theory, in the lure of what Chris Kraus calls an “atmosphere of meaning.”

12:30-1:30 pm | BREAK

1:45 pm | Ane Hjort Guttu and Nisa Mackie

It is an open question as to whether the museum provides the best context for artistic expression, social analysis, and political change. If the prevailing aim is to subvert an existing socioeconomic order, in the “BIG” museum there is risk of subsumption by the dominant hegemony—or worse, a forced double life. Ane Hjort Guttu and Nisa Mackie will engage with this question by interrogating how artists might navigate the super structures that govern the production, circulation, and reception of their work. The dialogue presents the possibility of temporal utopia that often precedes the nexus of personal and political crises. This might take the form of speculation and fantasy, play, abstraction, or true praxis— all of which point to forms of the possible.

2:30 pm | Elizabeth Povinelli

Filmmaking as Perpetual Motion Museum

In 2012, under the auspices of the Karrabing Film Collective, Elizabeth Povinelli and her Indigenous colleagues began making short films as a method of self– organization, social analysis, and alternative imaginaries. The films were residual artifacts of this practice of a living analytics. They were like Hitchcock’s MacGuffin, a plot device that can organize a pursuit whose actual aim is survivance. As objects, however, the films provide storage of an alternative history of the present that can in turn be stored in a future alternative museum. But they threaten to provide a site of social fetishization, as if the central value lay in the aesthetics of the objects rather than the survivance of worlds. How might an avant–garde museum be not a storage bin for anesthetized objects but rather a space for the perpetual exfoliations of alternative worlds?

3:30-3:45 pm | BREAK

3:45 pm | Cary Wolfe and Timothy Morton

Avant What?

In this freewheeling conversation, Timothy Morton and Cary Wolfe will explore the idea of the “avant” and the various ways in which “avantness” has historically been incarnated in art, literature, music, and culture. Both authors will discuss the relationship of the idea of the avant to their own work and the extent to which it is or isn’t a useful way to think about ideas of time and temporality, newness and oldness, chronology and succession, beforeness and afterness, and the layered, textured, multi–species spaces in which culture (and not just human culture) happens: Morton in relation to his writings on literature, art, music, and ecology in landmark texts such as Ecology Without Nature, The Ecological Thought, Hyperobjects, and Dark Ecology; and Wolfe in relation to his work as both author (Critical Environments, Animal Rites, and What Is Posthumanism?) and founding editor of the Posthumanities series at the University of Minnesota Press.

Speaker Biographies

Jonathas de Andrade is an artist based in Recife, Brazil. De Andrade investigates social, political, cultural, and ideological issues at risk of vanishing from collective memory: what humanity chooses to retain or allows to sink into oblivion. Through a variety of processes involving photography, research, documentation, and personal experience, de Andrade summons up a slice of memory and offers a deliberation on various forms of collective amnesia. His work has been shown in exhibitions such as Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today at the Guggenheim Museum and the 12 Lyon Biennale. In 2012, his participation in the Future Generation Art Prize 2012 exhibition by the Victor Pinchuk Foundation earned him a special jury prize.

Adrienne Edwards is curator-at-large at the Walker Art Center, curator for Performa, and a PhD candidate in performance studies at New York University, where she is a Corrigan Doctoral Fellow. Her focus is on artists of the African diaspora and the global South. Recent projects have included organizing and co-organizing Fluxus founding member Benjamin Patterson’s first retrospective concert Action as Composition (2013) and Pope.L’s Cage Unrequited (2013) for Performa 13, and Jonathas de Andrade’s A Study of Race and Class – Bahia >< New York (2015) and Chimurenga’s Library for Performa 15. She most recently curated the exhibition and published the catalogue Blackness in Abstraction for Pace Gallery.

Boris Groys is a philosopher, essayist, art critic, media theorist, and an internationally renowned expert on Soviet-era art and literature, specifically, the Russian avant-garde. He is a Global Distinguished Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University, a Senior Research Fellow at the Staatliche Hochschule für Gestaltung Karlsruhe, and a professor of philosophy at The European Graduate School / EGS. His work engages radically different traditions from French poststructuralism to modern Russian philosophy, yet is firmly situated at the juncture of aesthetics and politics. Theoretically, Boris Groys’ work is influenced by a number of modern and post-modern philosophers and theoreticians, including Jacques Derrida, Jean Baudrillard, Gilles Deleuze and Walter Benjamin.

Ane Hjort Guttu is an artist living in Oslo. She works in a variety of media, but has in recent years mainly concentrated on film and video works, ranging from investigative documentary to poetic fiction. Guttu’s practice is concerned with individuals’ everyday operation within larger structures—institutions of labor, education, or politics—that define and interpolate subjectivities. Among recurrent themes in her work are the relationship between freedom and power, economy and the public space, social change, and limits of action. Between 2011 and 2016 she directed various portrait films in which a central conflict reappears: an individual dissident struggling to handle and subvert oppressive social structures. Guttu is also active as a curator and writer.

Wayne Koestenbaum has published 18 books of poetry, criticism, and fiction, including Notes on Glaze, The Pink Trance Notebooks, My 1980s & Other Essays, Hotel Theory, Best-Selling Jewish Porn Films, Andy Warhol, Humiliation, Jackie Under My Skin, and The Queen’s Throat (a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist). He has had solo exhibitions of his paintings at White Columns (New York), 356 Mission (Los Angeles), and the University of Kentucky Art Museum. His first piano/vocal record, Lounge Act, will be issued by Ugly Duckling Presse Records this year. He is a Distinguished Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and French at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City.

Nisa Mackie is director and curator of Education and Public Programs at the Walker Art Center. Hailing from Sydney, Australia, Mackie came to the Walker after managing education and public programs at the Biennale of Sydney, where she organized discursive programs, performances, innovative learning initiatives, and large-scale artist projects and residencies featuring a wide range of artists, including Douglas Gordon, Ane Hjort Guttu, Gabriel Lester, Randi and Katrine, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Fred Tomaselli, AES+F, and Darius Miksys.

Fionn Meade is artistic director at the Walker Art Center, where he has curated Merce Cunningham: Common Time, Question the Wall Itself, Less Than One, and Andrea Büttner and served as the Walker’s coordinating curator of the traveling exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art. Prior to the Walker, Meade curated performance commissions with Eva Kotátková at the National Gallery, and with Laure Prouvost at Danspace Project, New York. Recent catalogue writing includes essays on Dieter Roth, Camille Henrot, Nina Canell and Laure Prouvost, Uri Aran and Elad Lassry. His writing also appears in Artforum, Bidoun, Mousse, Modern Painters, Parkett, and SPIKE Quarterly, among other publications.

Sohrab Mohebbi is a curator and writer currently based in Los Angeles, where he is the associate curator at REDCAT. He is the corecipient of the 2013 Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award for the exhibition Hotel Theory. Mohebbi is the recipient of 2012 Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Program for the blog Presence Documents. His writings have been published in Bidoun Magazine, where he is a contributing editor, as well Artforum, Art Agenda, and Modern Painters, among others. He is an advisor at the Rijksakademie, Amsterdam. Mohebbi is a cofounder of Bureau des Services sans Spécificité, Geneva. He is a graduate of Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College and holds a BFA from Tehran Art University.

Timothy Morton is Rita Shea Guffey Chair in English at Rice University. He gave the Wellek Lectures in Theory in 2014, and has collaborated with Björk, Haim Steinbach, and Olafur Eliasson. He is the author of Dark Ecology: For a Logic of Future Coexistence (2016), Nothing: Three Inquiries in Buddhism (2015), Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World (2013), Realist Magic: Objects, Ontology, Causality (2013), The Ecological Thought (2010), Ecology without Nature (2007), and 8 other books and 160 essays on philosophy, ecology, literature, music, art, architecture, design, and food. He blogs regularly at www.ecologywithoutnature.blogspot.com.

Elizabeth A. Povinelli is Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University, where she has also served as director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality and the Center for the Study of Law and Culture. Povinelli is the author of five books examining the conditions of late liberalism in settler societies. And as a member of the Karrabing Film Collective, she has directed three of their award-winning short films.

Walid Raad is an artist and an associate professor of art at Cooper Union, New York. Raad’s works include The Atlas Group, a 15-year project (1989–2004) about the contemporary history of Lebanon, and the ongoing projects Scratching on Things I Could Disavow and Sweet Talk: Commissions (Beirut).

Hito Steyerl lives and works in Berlin. Steyerl’s prolific filmmaking and writing occupies a highly discursive position between the fields of art, philosophy, and politics—constituting a deep exploration of late capitalism’s social, cultural, and financial imaginaries. Her films and lectures have increasingly addressed the presentational context of art, while her writing has circulated widely through publication in both academic and art journals, often online. She has had solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2016); Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid (2015); and Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven (2015); among many others. Her group exhibitions include the Venice Biennale (2015 and 2013); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2015); and documenta 12, Kassel (2007); and others.

Anton Vidokle is an artist based in New York and Berlin. As a founder of e-flux, Vidokle has produced projects such as DO iT, Utopia Station Poster Project, Pawnshop, An Image Bank for Everyday Revolutionary Life, the Martha Rosler Library, Time/Bank, e-flux video rental, and unitednationsplaza. Vidokle is coeditor of e-flux journal, along with Julieta Aranda and Brian Kuan Wood. His work has been exhibited internationally, in venues such as the 56th Venice Biennale (2015) and Documenta 13 (2012). He has directed several films, including 2084: A science fiction show (2012–2014) with Pelin Tan. Vidokle’s series of films on the Russian cosmists, This Is Cosmos (2014) and The Communist Revolution Was Caused By The Sun (2015), have been exhibited and screened internationally.

Cary Wolfe holds the Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Chair in English at Rice University, where he is Founding Director of 3CT: The Center for Critical and Cultural Theory. His books and edited collections include Animal Rites: American Culture, The Discourse of Species, and Posthumanist Theory (2003), the edited collections Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal (2003) and (with Branka Arsic) The Other Emerson (2010), and, most recently, What Is Posthumanism? (2010) and Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame (2013). He is founding editor of the series Posthumanities at the University of Minnesota Press.

Arseny Zhilyaev is an artist who lives in Moscow and Voronezh. Zhilyaev has presented recent exhibitions at venues such as Moderna Gallerija, Ljubljana (2016); Centre Pompidou, Paris (2016); de Appel, Amsterdam (2016); 9th edition of Liverpool Biennial (2016); and 13th edition of the Biennale de Lyon (2015). Zhilyaev is the editor of Avant-Garde Museology (V-a-c Press with e-flux and University of Minnesota Press, 2015). He has been on the editorial board of Moscow Art Magazine since 2011, and is a contributor to e-flux journal. Recent accolades include Russian awards in the sphere of contemporary art, and a nomination for the Visible Award in 2013.