Loading
  • Grid
  • List

Collections Browse Nautilus

Collections Browse Nautilus

Image Rights
Close
Image
Courtesy Walker Art Center
Rights
Copyright retained by the artist

Copyright

All content including images, text documents, audio, video, and interactive media published on the Walker web site (walkerart.org) is for noncommercial, educational and/or personal use only. Any commercial use or republication is strictly prohibited. Copying, redistribution, or exploitation for personal or corporate gain is not permitted.

To obtain permission, or for information on slides and reproductions, please contact Loren Smith, Assistant Registrar at 612.375.7673 or rights.reproductions@walkerart.org.

Title
Nautilus
Date
1976
Dimensions
installation dimensions vary 132 × 264 × 408 inches
Materials
Cor-Ten steel
Location
On view at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis Sculpture Garden

Object Details

Type
Sculpture
Accession Number
1976.17
Credit Line
Acquired with funds from Dr. and Mrs. John S. Jacoby in memory of John Dixon Jacoby; Suzanne Walker and Thomas N. Gilmore; the Art Center Acquisition Fund; and the National Endowment for the Arts, 1976

artwork entry Charles Ginnever, Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, 1998

The design for Charles Ginnever’s mammoth steel sculpture was inspired by one of nature’s unique primitive structures: the spiraling, chambered shell of the marine mollusk known as the nautilus. Like Richard Serra’s Five Plates, Two Poles, also constructed from massive plates of industrial Cor-Ten steel, the sculpture’s seemingly precarious balance merely suggests impending collapse. To understand its spatially complex form the viewer must circle around the piece, tracing the spiral motion of the progressively sized chambers to discover the secret of its design: six flat parallelograms, folded at regularly increasing intervals, that are welded together. Ginnever got the idea for folding flat sheets into a three-dimensional object—abstract yet suggesting a real figure—from Japanese origami, the decorative art of cut-and-folded paper. The changing light and seasons interact with the sculpture’s surfaces to create subtly shifting visual effects.

Jenkins, Janet, ed. Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Minneapolis, MN: Walker Art Center, 1998, no. 36.

© 1998 Walker Art Center