Wunderkammer submissions


Each page comprises one student's submission, and includes:
Object 1 first (image, ratings, text)
Object 2 (image, ratings, text)
Explanation of how those two objects relate.


Sarah Bush

resolvable: 4
gigantic: 5
complex: 6
feminine: 10
young: 7
sticky: 5
public: 8
proprietary: 8

This painting doesn't seem to strive for realistic representations of depth of space or light, and instead focuses on colorful and playful treatment of the cat figure, and so it may be more like a folk-art type object. The cat-bride stands centrally in the painting, and is surrounded by all the things that cats love: an open field, a mouse and fish. Aside from these logical associations, for ambiguous reasons, the cat is also pictured in a wedding dress. The painting seems to be organized in a kind of confused and almost child-like manner, like the artist was attempting to squeeze in all these cat-like-things into the painting, and simply ran out of room. And so the fish ended up in the sky? Or are they flying fish? With this very central composition the painting identifies itself as a type of portraiture. The meaning of what is being captured, however, is quite unclear. The painting takes the serious matter of marriage, and turns it on its ear. The cat starts to look almost menacing in comparrison to her symbolically innocent dressing. The wedding dress strongly suggests that there should be a pair pictured, yet it is not ascertained to what or whom the cat is being wedded. Though it appears at the bottom of the painting, the mouse may be her groom since it is bound to her by a leash. But since when have leashes been included in bridal dressing? And since when have cats, for that matter? It could be a metaphorical portrait of a human bride and groom between whom there exists this inequity in power.


Sarah Bush

resolvable: 8
gigantic: 5
complex: 2
feminine: 1
young: 2
sticky: 6
public: 9
proprietary: 6

The image is a color photograph of a man in a car shaped like a giant banana. This photograph immediately brings to mind certain questions of identity. A person's mode of transportation often takes on a representational value much greater than that of just carrying the person from one end of town to the other. In the modern world, a person's car often becomes a sort of totem. Though it exists in many other examples, the link between identity and cars comes most obviously with men and sports cars. For some (but not all) male owners of sports cars, the power of the car, the speed, acceleration, and invariably, the stick shift, come to represent the driver's own professed masculine power and virility. The banana, with its oblong shape, has long been ab obvious phallic symbol. Is the bananacar an exanded and even more direct reference to these potent symbols? More than simply embodying the qualities associated with virility and masculinity, is the banana car intended to be the phalus itself? The banana car is an art car. Owners of art cars recognize the link between cars and identity, and capitalize on this value for their own self expression, most of all relishing the extreme publicity. In their way, art cars share the same potential for expression as the web does. Anyone who owns a car and feels creatively compelled can create an art car and display it in a very public forum. Similarly, anyone who owns a computer with a connection to the web and feels creatively compelled can create their own web art and display it in a very public forum.


Sarah Bush

resolvable: 8
gigantic: 5
complex: 2
feminine: 1
young: 2
sticky: 6
public: 9
proprietary: 6

The image is a color photograph of a man in a car shaped like a giant banana. This photograph immediately brings to mind certain questions of identity. A person's mode of transportation often takes on a representational value much greater than that of just carrying the person from one end of town to the other. In the modern world, a person's car often becomes a sort of totem. Though it exists in many other examples, the link between identity and cars comes most obviously with men and sports cars. For some (but not all) male owners of sports cars, the power of the car, the speed, acceleration, and invariably, the stick shift, come to represent the driver's own professed masculine power and virility. The banana, with its oblong shape, has long been ab obvious phallic symbol. Is the bananacar an exanded and even more direct reference to these potent symbols? More than simply embodying the qualities associated with virility and masculinity, is the banana car intended to be the phalus itself? The banana car is an art car. Owners of art cars recognize the link between cars and identity, and capitalize on this value for their own self expression, most of all relishing the extreme publicity. In their way, art cars share the same potential for expression as the web does. Anyone who owns a car and feels creatively compelled can create an art car and display it in a very public forum. Similarly, anyone who owns a computer with a connection to the web and feels creatively compelled can create their own web art and display it in a very public forum.