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Collections Browse Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp)

Collections Browse Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp)

Title
Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp)
Date
1960
Dimensions
overall installed 90 × 118 × 5 inches
Materials
oil, charcoal, paper, fabric, metal on canvas, drinking glass, metal chain, spoon, necktie
Location
Not on view

Object Details

Type
Paintings (Paintings)
Accession Number
1970.1.1-.4
Style
Abstract
Inscriptions
Reverse each section signed “Rauschenberg 1960”
Physical Description
Abstract composition incorporating collage elements. Five panels are attached, four vertically and one horizontally. The remaining two canvases are displayed on each side of the attached canvases. Drinking glass in not the original.
Credit Line
Gift of the T. B. Walker Foundation, 1970

object label Robert Rauschenberg, Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp) (1960) Walker Art Center, 1999

Any incentive to paint is as good as any other. There is no poor subject. Painting is always strongest when in spite of composition, color, etc., it appears as a fact, or an inevitability, as opposed to a souvenir or arrangement. Painting relates to both art and life. Neither can be made … A pair of socks is no less suitable to make a painting with than wood, nails, turpentine, oil, and fabric. –Robert Rauschenberg, 1959

In the early 1950s, Robert Rauschenberg devised a radical new form, blending two- dimensional collage techniques with three-dimensional objects on painted surfaces. Definable neither as sculpture nor painting, these works were dubbed “combines” by the artist to describe their interdisciplinary formal roots. Rauschenberg’s combination of found imagery and gestural brushwork places these works between two movements in painting: Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art.

Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp) is one of a series of five combines, all called “trophies,” which alluded to the unconventional creative spirit of artists whose work Rauschenberg greatly admired: in this case, Marcel Duchamp and his wife, Teeny. Using found objects, photographs, and paint, the artist considered himself “a collaborator with objects.” In this way, he sought to avoid excessive autobiographical readings and instead refers to the dynamics of the urban landscape.

Walker solo exhibition: Robert Rauschenberg: Painting, 1965

Label text for Robert Rauschenberg, Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp) (1960), from the exhibition Art in Our Time: 1950 to the Present, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, September 5, 1999 to September 2, 2001.

Copyright 1999 Walker Art Center

object label Robert Rauschenberg, Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp) (1960) Walker Art Center, 1998

“I find [Marcel Duchamp’s] life and work a constant inspiration. … His Bicycle Wheel has always struck me as one of the most beautiful pieces of sculpture I’ve ever seen.”–Robert Rauschenberg

In the early 1950s, Robert Rauschenberg devised a radical new form, blending two-dimensional collage techniques with three-dimensional objects on painted surfaces. Definable neither as sculpture nor painting, these works were dubbed “combines” by the artist to describe their interdisciplinary formal roots.

Trophy II is one of a series of five combines, all called “trophies,” which alluded to the unconventional creative spirit of artists whose work Rauschenberg greatly admired. Using found objects, photographs, and paint, the artist considered himself “a collaborator with objects.” In this way, he sought to avoid excessive autobiographical readings and instead refers to the dynamics of the urban landscape.

Label text for Robert Rauschenberg, Trophy II (for Teeny and Marcel Duchamp) (1960), from the exhibition Selections from the Permanent Collection, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, December 8, 1996 to April 4, 1999.

Copyright 1998 Walker Art Center